Tessa’s fishing boat

Sorry for the lack of posts lately… but hopefully you’ll enjoy this creation from Tessa.

First though a bit of backstory…

It’s been really hot everywhere, but even a bit more than what we’re used to out here in the Pacific Northwest so there’s been lots of water play going on at our house. As a result, it didn’t take us long to start making some LEGO boats (I posted a few earlier back in June: https://legotessa.wordpress.com/2013/06/07/legos-in-the-kiddie-pool/).

After making a few boats with Tessa, I remembered one of my favorite sets as a kid was a Police Boat set. I got online and within a few minutes on Google, I found the one I had:

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This set is from 1978! It was great because it really floated in the water and I really wanted to find this set or something like it so Tessa could enjoy it like I did.

I went on BrickLink, a place I’ve purchased some used LEGO bricks in the past, to see if I could find that Police Boat set.

I found 4 sets ranging in price from $15 to $170. Yes, $170!! I didn’t even want to spend $15 so I tried finding the main boat parts, but didn’t really have any success with that either.

Instead, I settled on a fishing boat bottom piece and purchased that for $2.50.

When it came in the mail, Tessa was really excited and got to work right away on making her boat. She really wanted to do it on her own and have only been stepping in when she’s asked for help or has shed a few tears in frustration.

Here’s what Tessa came up with and not only was I proud of her creation, but she was immensely proud and had a huge grin from ear-to-ear:

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If you notice, Tessa made the boat symmetrical and as a result, when we put it in the kiddie pool, it didn’t immediately sink (it eventually did, because it was pretty heavy). This really got me excited, because in June when we first started making our boats, we talked a lot about how to keep the boats afloat and one topic we spent some time on was how keeping the boats even and symmetrical in their design helped keep them afloat longer. Evidently, she listened and with no help from me, incorporate those quick, informal lessons into this design.

 

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